Green Card for Parents

Green cards are available for the parents of U.S. citizens, enabling them to live and work in the U.S. as lawful permanent residents. This includes stepparents and adoptive parents. For parents to obtain a green card, both the citizen and their parents must demonstrate that they meet all the qualifications. This is often easier said than done.

To avoid mistakes that could cause your application to be delayed or denied, you should consider working with a knowledgeable immigration lawyer. At American Dream™ Law Office, we focus our efforts every day on finding the best ways to help clients obtain green cards and reach other immigration goals.

The First Step is to File a Petition for Immigration

To start the process of applying for a green card for parents, the U.S. citizen files a Form I-130 Petition for Alien Relative with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). You must be at least 21-years-old to file the petition, and you must have evidence to document your relationship to the parents you are petitioning for.

Depending on the situation, you may need to submit documentation such as

  • Birth certificate showing parents’ names
  • U.S. passport or Certificate of Naturalization
  • Civil marriage certificate of your parents
  • Legitimation records or other evidence of a parental relationship
  • Divorce or annulment decrees or death certificates
  • Adoption certificate

After USCIS reviews the information you submitted, they may have questions or request additional data. It is important to be sure that the agency has current contact information to reach you, and that if you receive messages that you respond promptly so your application will not be delayed or denied.

The Second Step Depends on Circumstances

In addition to filing the immigration petition with USCIS, you also need to file an application for a visa or to adjust status to that of permanent resident. You have three options, and your immigration attorney can help you determine which approach makes the most sense in your situation.

1) Consular Processing

With this process, USCIS forwards information to the Visa Center at the U.S. State Department. The Visa Center sends out an application and requests for other vital information. The applicant will be scheduled for a medical exam and interview. The interview will take place at the U.S. embassy or consulate in the country where the applicant is living.

2) Adjustment of Status

When a visa applicant is already living in the U.S., they can file a Form I-485 Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status. If processing times are longer or the applicant’s visa is soon to expire, it may make more sense to return to the home country for consular processing. 

3) Concurrent Filing

It is often possible to file for adjustment of status before the immigration petition has been approved by USCIS, or even at the same time as filing the petition.

Find Out How American Dream™ Law Office Can Help Parents Obtain a Green Card

When you are applying for a green card, you do not want to make a mistake that could cause immigration officials to believe that any of your documentation is fraudulent. Even a simple mistake such as forgetting to inform the right people when you have a change of address can have serious long-term consequences for immigration eligibility.

Working with an experienced immigration lawyer at American Dream™ Law Office helps you avoid critical errors and allow you to proceed through the immigration process with as few delays as possible.

To find out how our dedicated immigration team can help you obtain a green card for parents, contact our office today.

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